Downtown Springfield Association
Moxie Cinema's The Essentials: The Lady Eve

Moxie Cinema’s The Essentials: The Lady Eve

November, 26 2018 | 7:15 pm

305 S Campbell Ave Springfield, Missouri 65806
www.moxiecinema.com

$9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in free


“A movie like The Lady Eve is so hard to make that you can’t make it at all unless you find a way to make it seem effortless. Preston Sturges does a kind of breathless balancing act here, involving romance, deception and physical comedy.”
– Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times
SHOWTIMES
Sunday, 11/25 – 3:15pm
Monday, 11/26 – 7:15pm

The Essentials: Classic Comedies
This quarterly series showcases the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen. For each month-long program, we’ll screen five films organized by one of the following themes: directors, actors, genres, and eras/movements.

Essential tickets are $9 for Adults, $8 for Students/Seniors and Members get in Free!

Film Synopsis:
In Preston Sturges’ comedy, Henry Fonda stars as Charles Pike, the son of a beer magnate who becomes the target of the father-daughter team of card sharps ‘Colonel’ Harry and Jean Harrington (Charles Coburn and Barbara Stanwyck). Their plan to rob the naive young man blind hits a snag, however, when Jean actually falls head over heels for an equally-smitten Pike.

Film Information:
Starring: Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda, Charles Coburn
Director: Preston Sturges
Genre(s): Classics, Comedy, Romance
Rating: NR
Running Time: 94 min.

Reviews:
“Barbara Stanwyck is the sexiest con woman ever captured on film.”
– Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

“Third writer-director effort of Preston Sturges [from a story by Monckton Hoffe] is laugh entertainment of top proportions with its combo of slick situations, spontaneous dialog and a few slapstick falls tossed in for good measure.”
– Variety Staff, Variety

“Preston Sturges extended his range beyond the crazy farces that had made his reputation with this romantic 1941 comedy, and his hand proved just as sure.”
– Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

“A movie like The Lady Eve is so hard to make that you can’t make it at all unless you find a way to make it seem effortless. Preston Sturges does a kind of breathless balancing act here, involving romance, deception and physical comedy.”
– Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times